SENATOR PADILLA CHAMPIONS NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA’S PUBLIC LANDS AND RIVERS

Bill would promote restoration, wildfire protection, conservation, and recreation in four counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 3, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, Senator Alex Padilla announced the introduction of the PUBLIC Lands Act, co-sponsored by Senator Dianne Feinstein, to protect local wild lands, boost local economies, expand recreational opportunities, improve fire management, and enhance water quality and wildlife protections in Northwest California. The bill is a companion to Representative Jared Huffman (D-CA)’s Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act, which passed the House of Representatives in February.

The legislation includes protections for nearly 300,000 acres of wilderness and 480 miles of wild and scenic rivers, and establishes a 729,000-acre restoration area in Northern California’s Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, and Del Norte Counties.

The bill will establish the South Fork Trinity River-Mad River Restoration Area, which will restore forests, habitat, and fisheries. In addition, provisions in the bill will help improve community fire safety by creating a network of roadside shaded fuel breaks in the South Fork Trinity-Mad River Restoration Area, and requiring the US Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management to work with local residents to create a new coordinated fire management plan for all of the designated wilderness areas in the region. The Act will also help clean up public lands that have been damaged by illegal trespass activity, such as marijuana grows.

Will Harling, Director of the Mid Klamath Watershed Council, said, “This bill is a well thought out and balanced approach to protecting key watersheds while still protecting our rural communities from the ever increasing risk of wildfire.”

Dozens of community leaders, tourism organizations, outdoor recreation groups, restoration specialists, county supervisors, conservationists, forestry experts, fisheries biologists, fire ecologists, and business owners provided input on the bill. It will help preserve and expand trail access and opportunities for hiking in Wilderness, fishing regional rivers and streams, whitewater boating, and mountain biking for residents and visitors alike.

“In this modern age of smartphones and social media, young people need experiences in our natural world,” said Kent Collard, Director of Bar 717 Ranch in Hayfork. “These opportunities are a rare and irreplaceable part of their lives. The Pattison Roadless Area, Hayfork Creek and the surrounding Wilderness are not only the backdrop for these experiences at our Camp Trinity, they are the palate with which our campers paint the canvas of their self-image and confidence for their future lives. Our alumni are spread across the country and around the world, and they carry the legacy of these wild and special places close to their hearts. I deeply appreciate Senator Padilla’s introduction of this important legislation.”

Jennifer Johnson, owner of Adventures Edge, said, “As the current owner of an outdoor recreation business that has been a part of Humboldt’s recreation economy for over 50 years, and employs 18 people, I am thrilled that Senator Padilla has introduced the PUBLIC Lands Act that includes the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation and Working Forests Act. The legislation builds on the strong recreation economy of northwest California that has benefited local citizens and drawn visitors from around the nation. I look forward to exploring these important places with my family and sharing them with our visitors.”

The PUBLIC Lands Act also extends special conservation designations to local rivers and streams, which will protect watersheds for native fish populations, recreational activities, and drinking water for downstream communities while also safeguarding habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead populations. Dozens of streams and rivers in Northwest California contribute to the region’s world-renowned salmon and steelhead habitat and water quality.

Permanent protection of these lands will also support Northwest California’s tourism industry, which attracts visitors locally and from around the globe. According to Visit California, in 2018 visitors spent nearly $1.2 billion in Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino counties combined. Sport fishing and whitewater boating contribute significantly to the area’s economy, and the enhanced protections in this bill would draw even more outdoor enthusiasts and their dollars to local economies.

“Local economies in Northwest California benefit when people come to visit our spectacular public lands and rivers,” commented Gregg Foster, Executive Director of Redwood Region Economic Development Commission, “I greatly appreciate and am excited to celebrate the Senate introduction of this legislation that will protect and restore some of the region’s most cherished landscapes. Thank you Senator Padilla for your leadership on this issue.”

During the last Congress, then-Senator Kamala Harris and Sen. Feinstein championed similar legislation. Advocates are celebrating the fact that Sen. Padilla reintroduced the bill so soon after taking office. The bill includes measures that will protect public lands and rivers throughout the state.

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The Northwest Mountains and Rivers Campaign is a coalition of conservation organizations, business owners, land owners, biologists, hunters, anglers and other community members who support Congressman Huffman’s effort to protect special places, restore watersheds and fisheries, support economic development, enhance recreational opportunities, and protect communities. Learn more: mountainsandrivers.org

HOUSE PASSES KEY PROTECTIONS FOR NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA FORESTS AND RIVERS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 26, 2021

HOUSE PASSES KEY PROTECTIONS FOR NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA FORESTS AND RIVERS 

The bill promotes forest restoration, wildfire protection, conservation, and recreation in four counties

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the House of Representatives passed the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act. This bill will guard communities against wildfires, boost local economies, improve outdoor recreation access, and enhance water quality and wildlife protections in Northwest California. Representative Jared Huffman (D-CA) introduced the Act in the House.

The protections span public lands throughout Northern California’s Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, and Del Norte Counties. This includes designating about 317,000 acres of public lands as wilderness, 379 miles of new wild and scenic rivers, and requiring management plans for an additional 101 miles of existing wild and scenic rivers. These new conservation measures also will better protect critical water sources, fisheries and wildlife habitat,

Advocates are congratulating Representative Huffman for championing this effort in the House, and asking the Senate to take action. In particular, local supporters hope to see Senator Padilla help carry this effort over the finish line this year. Vice President Harris and Senator Feinstein championed complementary legislation in the Senate during the last Congress.

Click here for the full announcement from Representative Huffman. 

Below are quotes from local leaders marking this moment:

Jennifer Johnson, Owner, Adventures Edge

“As the current owner of an outdoor recreation business that has been a part of Humboldt’s recreation economy for over 50 years, and employs 18 people,  I am thrilled this bill is closer to becoming law. The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation and Working Forests Act builds on the strong recreation economy of our region that has benefited local citizens and drawn visitors from around the nation. I look forward to exploring these important places with my family and sharing them with our visitors.”

Will Harling, Director, Mid Klamath Watershed Council 

“This bill is a well thought out and balanced approach to protecting key watersheds while still protecting our rural communities from the ever increasing risk of wildfire.” 

David Steinhauser, Owner, Trinity River Rafting

“As the owner of Trinity River Rafting, a local business that depends on the health of our rivers and lands, I strongly support Representative Huffman’s Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act.  Like our many customers who enjoy rafting and hiking along the rivers proposed for protection, my wife and I love to hike and run along the Canyon Creek trail, and its spectacular waterfalls and cascades.  This legislation will ensure that these magnificent places are around for future generations to enjoy.”

Angel Brewer, Realtor, Weaverville

“As a retail grocery store owner for over 17 years and now as a Realtor, I recognize the multiple benefits of this proposal. I have experienced first-hand the year round economic activity that already exists because of our current protected public lands. Folks from all over the world come to hike the Alps, swim in the lakes, raft and fish the river and return during the winter holidays as well. This bill will expand these benefits for our local communities and enhance the positive impact of the millions of visitors who come to experience outdoor recreation in Northwest California.”

Trevor Fagerskog, Chair, California Council of Trout Unlimited

California’s salmon and steelhead have sustained cultures and local economies for generations. But many populations of these iconic fish are now listed or at-risk. We need to do more to conserve our best coldwater habitats and fisheries. Representative Huffman, being an angler himself, knows this better than most. Trout Unlimited applauds his leadership over many years in building this timely legislation, which is vital for better protecting and restoring some of the most famous steelhead streams in the world, including the Trinity and Eel Rivers.”

# # #The Northwest Mountains and Rivers Campaign is a coalition of conservation organizations, business owners, land owners, biologists, hunters, anglers and other community members who support Congressman Huffman’s effort to protect special places, restore watersheds and fisheries, support economic development, enhance recreational opportunities, and protect communities. Learn more: mountainsandrivers.org

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES DELIVERS VICTORY FOR CALIFORNIA’S PUBLIC LANDS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 21, 2020

Contact: Suzanne Spencer, 510-550-8172, suzanne@fcpcommunications.com

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES DELIVERS VICTORY FOR CALIFORNIA’S PUBLIC LANDS

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the House of Representatives passed legislation that will protect public lands and rivers throughout California. This bill, Protecting American’s Wilderness Act, is championed in California by Reps. Carbajal, Chu, Huffman, and Schiff, and passed as an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act.

The Protecting America’s Wilderness Act will safeguard more than a million acres of public lands and well over 500 miles of rivers in California, in the Northwest, Central Coast, and Los Angeles regions, in addition to public lands and rivers in Washington and Colorado. In California, it is a key step forward in ensuring equitable access to public lands for local communities,
supports public health and economic recovery, and is critical to the state’s work to address climate change and build resilience.

The Protecting America’s Wilderness Act also passed the House in February of this year. Today’s passage is particularly significant, however, given that the National Defense Authorization Act is considered to be “must-pass” legislation. In the Senate, Senator Harris has introduced the companion PUBLIC Lands Act, which will protect public lands and rivers in the Central Coast, Northwest, and San Gabriels areas. Senator Feinstein has also previously introduced legislation protecting the Rim of the Valley corridor in Southern California

Today’s House amendment includes the following places:

● Protection of public lands and rivers in Northwest California, including in Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity counties. This includes protecting about 317,000 acres of public lands as wilderness, designating 379 miles of new wild and scenic rivers, requiring management plans for an additional 101 miles of existing wild and scenic rivers.
● Protection of special places in the Los Padres National Forest and the Carrizo Plain National Monument, located in the Central Coast region. This includes approximately 288,000 acres of wilderness, two scenic areas encompassing 34,882 acres, and 159 miles of wild and scenic rivers. This would be the first wilderness protection on the Central Coast in twenty years, and is particularly important as many of these areas are currently under threat from extractive industries. It also includes the designation of a
400 mile-long trail, the Condor National Recreation Trail, which would connect the northern and southern portion of the Los Padres National Forest by a single hiking route.
● In the Los Angeles area, the bill would expand the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument by over 109,000 acres to include the western Angeles National Forest. The bill would also designate over 30,000 acres as protected Wilderness and over 45 miles of Wild and Scenic rivers throughout the San Gabriel range. Finally, the bill would also establish a National Recreation Area in the San Gabriel Valley.
● Also in the Los Angeles area, the bill would add more than 191,000 acres of the Rim of the Valley Corridor to the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. The Rim of the Valley stretches from the Simi Hills and Santa Susanas to the Verdugos and on to the San Gabriel Mountains.

Below are quotes from leaders marking this moment and urging the Senate to follow suit by passing legislation to protect these public lands and rivers:

Representative Judy Chu (CA-27):
“The San Gabriel Mountains, with their beautiful rivers, forests, and mountain trails so close to the density of Los Angeles, are a true gift for the millions who have little to no access to parks or green space. That’s why I want to make sure as many people as possible have the chance to visit, both today and for years in the future. That is what today’s vote will help accomplish. As our city grows and our climate changes, these untouched wild lands and habitats could disappear. This amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) will not only preserve this land for future generations, it will also create a National Recreation Area that will
let even more Angelenos enjoy our mountains.”

Rue Mapp, Founder and CEO of Outdoor Afro:
“Our state is rich with natural treasures but not all communities can access and enjoy these places. That’s why I’m so excited to see this legislation pass the House as part of the National Defense Authorization Act. Outdoor access is a fundamental right for us all. I look forward to working with the Senate to help protect our public lands.”

Kate Hoit, Vet Voice Foundation’s California State Director and OIF veteran:
“Throughout California veterans share a strong connection to our public lands. Today we celebrate the inclusion of four historic public lands bills in the National Defense Authorization Act. This legislation affirms the importance of outdoor access for the nearly two million veterans living in California.”

Gregg Foster, Executive Director of Redwood Regional Economic Development Commission:
“Local economies in Northwest California benefit when people come to visit our spectacular, world-renowned public lands and rivers. I greatly appreciate and am excited to again celebrate House passage of this legislation that will protect and restore some of the region’s most
cherished landscapes.”

Roberto Morales, Chair of the Nature for All Coalition:
“This National Defense Authorization Act includes measures to ensure that public lands in California and across the country are conserved and that everyone, especially underserved communities, can enjoy the outdoors. Protecting nature and increasing access to the outdoors provides immense benefits to our health, economy and environment– especially at a time we
need it most. We applaud the hard work of California champions — Representatives Chu, Huffman, Carbajal, Schiff and Senators Harris and Feinstein — to advance this legislation.”

David Page, Policy Director of Outdoor Alliance California:
“The Outdoor Alliance and its member organizations are thrilled that our House of Representatives have included protections for California’s public lands in the current National Defense Authorization Act. The outdoor recreation economy generates $92 billion in consumer spending here in California. Protecting cherished landscapes in Northwest, Central and Southern California will not just help improve access for outdoor
recreationists, they will help support local businesses and communities. We look forward to seeing these bills advance in the Senate.”

Photos of relevant landscapes are available for use here.

HOUSE PASSES BILL TO IMPROVE OUTDOOR ACCESS AND PROTECTIONS IN NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA

The bill promotes restoration, wildfire protection, conservation, and recreation in four counties

WASHINGTON, D.C. — On February 12th, the House of Representatives passed the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act. This bill will guard communities against wildfires, boost local economies, improve outdoor recreation access, and enhance water quality and wildlife protections in California. The protections span public lands throughout Northern California’s Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, and Del Norte Counties.

Representative Jared Huffman (D-CA) introduced the Act in the House following years of input from dozens of community leaders, tourism organizations, outdoor recreation groups, restoration specialists, tribes, county supervisors, conservationists, forestry experts, fisheries biologists, fire ecologists, timber companies, and other business owners.

The Act will establish the South Fork Trinity River-Mad River Restoration Area, which will restore forests, habitat, and fisheries. In addition, provisions in the bill will help improve community fire safety by creating a network of roadside shaded fuel breaks in the South Fork Trinity-Mad River Restoration Area, and requiring the US Forest Service and the BLM to work with local residents to create a new coordinated fire management plan for all of the designated wilderness areas in the region. The Act will also help clean up public lands that have been damaged by illegal trespass activity, such as marijuana grows. 

The Act will also help preserve and expand trail access and opportunities for hiking in the wilderness, fishing area rivers and streams, whitewater boating, and mountain biking for residents and visitors alike.

“The Trinity River is one of those special steelhead fisheries where you can have multiple fish days,” said Leslie Ajari, fishing guide with Confluence Outfitters. “It’s kind of unique in that way. Rivers like this can provide a really good quality of life. We have to think in bigger terms about how to keep watersheds like the Trinity productive as habitat and as places where fishing helps support local economies. I’m very pleased that Rep. Huffman’s and Senator Harris’ bill will do this for the Trinity and other important streams in one of the last great steelhead strongholds in North America.”

“Northwest California’s wild places have been my refuge for the past 40 years, helping me process my time in Vietnam and build relationships with other veterans,” said Steve Robinson, a Navy Vietnam War veteran. “It’s gratifying to see this legislation pass the House of Representatives, and I urge the Senate to act soon to help ensure that the region’s forests and rivers are healthy and thriving for future generations to enjoy. Veteran’s deserve it and so do our grandchildren.”

Permanent protection of these lands will also support Northwest California’s tourism industry, which attracts visitors locally and from around the globe. According to Visit California, in 2018 visitors spent nearly $1.2 billion in Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino counties combined. Sport fishing and whitewater boating contribute significantly to the area’s economy, and the enhanced protections in this Act would draw even more outdoor enthusiasts and their dollars to local economies.

“As a local business owner and parent, I am thrilled that the House has passed the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act,” said Jennifer Johnson, owner of Adventures Edge. “The Trinity Alps Wilderness and the Canyon Creek Watershed bring in tourism that support my business, and I take my kids backpacking and floating in these areas during the summer. I want to continue recreating in these areas​ for years to come.”

“Like many other businesses in this area, ours is fueled by people seeking to experience the wild beauty of Trinity County,” said Kent Collard, Director of Bar 717 Ranch, Camp Trinity. “We need wilderness, clean free-flowing rivers, trails and healthy forests to sustain our business, just as we need economic development in our communities for our employees and their families to thrive. I applaud the House for passing the bill and urge the Senate to take action.”

Last year, Senator Kamala Harris also introduced the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act in the Senate. Senator Harris is expected to re-introduce a single piece of companion legislation that will protect public lands in the Northwest, as well as in the Central Coast and San Gabriels areas.

The Act extends special conservation designations to local rivers and streams which will protect watersheds for native fish populations, recreational activities, and drinking water for downstream communities while also safeguarding habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead populations. Dozens of streams and rivers in Northwest California contribute to the region’s world-renowned salmon and steelhead habitat and water quality.

If passed by the Senate, the Act will protect local wild lands, boost local economies, expand recreational opportunities, improve fire management, and restore impacted watersheds in Northwest California. The Act includes protections for nearly 300,000 acres of wilderness and 480 miles of wild and scenic rivers, and establishes a 729,000-acre restoration area.

# # #

The Northwest Mountains and Rivers Campaign is a coalition of conservation organizations, business owners, land owners, biologists, hunters, anglers and other community members who support Congressman Huffman’s effort to protect special places, restore watersheds and fisheries, support economic development, enhance recreational opportunities, and protect communities. Learn more: mountainsandrivers.org


HOUSE NATURAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE PASSES BILL TO RESTORE AND PROTECT NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LANDS AND RIVERS

Measure would support local economies and improve forest health and wildfire resiliency

Nov. 20, 2019–Today, the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources passed the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act (H.R. 2250), a bill that would safeguard some of the state’s most unique public lands and rivers for future generations. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) and Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced the legislation to protect and restore important public lands and rivers, improve community safety from fire, and help local communities capitalize on the region’s reputation as an outstanding destination for fishing, hunting, hiking, mountain biking, and other outdoor recreation opportunities.

Committee action on the bill builds on momentum in Congress to permanently protect cherished landscapes and waters across the nation, including enactment earlier this year of the widely celebrated John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act. In October, the House passed legislation to protect public lands in Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Local supporters are now urging quick passage of the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act by the full House and consideration in the Senate.

“I am pleased to see the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act moving through Congress,” said Mike Wilson, Humboldt County Supervisor. “This multi-faceted legislation addresses many of our community’s public lands needs, including fire management and safety, expanding recreation opportunities, and protecting some of our region’s wild public lands and rivers. We are grateful Rep. Huffman is undertaking this important work on our behalf.”

“As a local business owner, I am glad to see that the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation and Working Forests Act is moving through Congress,” said Aaron Ostrom, Co-owner of Pacific Outfitters and Co-founder of PacOut Green Team.  “My father started our business in 1968 and my brother and I have continued the family tradition of helping people get the gear they need to explore, camp, fish, and hunt across our beautiful region. These beautiful places support all of our local businesses, when people come to the area to experience the outdoors and shop while they are here.”

“This legislation helps provide the kind of diverse recreation opportunities that benefit our communities,” said Tom Phillips, Chair, Redwood Coast Mountain Bike Association.  “Accessibility to public lands is a key issue to recreationists, and we appreciate that Rep. Huffman addressed this community need by preserving access to existing trails, adding new trails and requiring a study of additional potential trails. Of special importance to our more than 250 members who rely on access to public lands are:  Preservation of access to the South Fork Trinity River trail, designation of the Elk Camp Ridge Recreation trail and establishment of the Horse Mountain Special Management Area.”

“Northwest California’s wild places have been my refuge for the past 40 years, helping me process my time in Vietnam and build relationships with other veterans,” said Steve Robinson, a Navy Vietnam War veteran. “This legislation will help ensure that the region’s forests and rivers are healthy and thriving for future generations to enjoy. Veteran’s deserve it and so do our grandchildren.” 

The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act is the product of years of input from business leaders, conservationists, anglers, mountain bikers, fire management professionals, and other stakeholders, which has led to broad public support for the legislation. The bill would conserve approximately 262,000 acres as wilderness, safeguard more than 379 miles of our wildest remaining streams as wild and scenic rivers, and create a special restoration area to protect communities from fire. 

Protected public lands help support the regional economy and enhance outdoor recreation opportunities by encouraging new infrastructure and upgrades to roads, trails and camping facilities, and by improving the health of the forest and its resilience to wildfire. The public lands and rivers at the heart of this legislation are the setting for countless world class outdoor recreation pursuits, including steelhead and salmon fishing, river floating and rafting, backcountry hiking and mountain biking, and sightseeing among the primeval redwoods.

According to the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation generates $92 billion in consumer spending and 691,000 direct jobs in California. Residents of the state’s 2nd congressional district spend $1.93 billion annually on outdoor recreation, and 134 outdoor companies are based here.

Provisions in the bill would help improve community fire safety by creating a network of roadside shaded fuel breaks in the South Fork Trinity-Mad River Restoration Area, and requiring the US Forest Service and the BLM to work with local residents to create a new coordinated fire management plan for all of the designated wilderness areas in the region. 

The legislation would also help cleanup public lands and waters affected by illegal marijuana cultivation by creating a local, state, federal and tribal partnership to coordinate activities and provide resources and expertise.

The bill would also call for developing a Regional Trails Plan and studying the feasibility of establishing The Bigfoot National Recreation Trail, which would highlight the world-­renowned botanical and biological diversity found in this region.

The widely supported legislation is cosponsored by 14 members of the California House delegation. The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act now awaits a vote by the full House and a hearing in the Senate.

U.S. House Subcommittee Hears Testimony on Bill to Restore and Protect Northwest California Public Lands and Rivers

Huffman measure would support local economies and improve forest health and wildfire resiliency

July 10, 2019 — The House of Representatives Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands today heard testimony on legislation to benefit some of Northwest California’s most unique lands and waters. The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act (H.R. 2250), sponsored by Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA), would protect and restore important public lands and rivers, improve community safety from fire, and help local communities capitalize on the region’s reputation as an outstanding destination for fishing, hunting, hiking, mountain biking, and other outdoor recreation opportunities.

The bill would conserve approximately 262,000 acres as wilderness, designate 379 miles of new wild and scenic rivers, and create a special restoration area to protect communities from fire. Years of input, from business leaders, conservationists, anglers, mountain bikers, fire management professionals, and other stakeholders, has led to broad public support for the legislation.

Testifying before the committee, Kent Collard, owner and director of the Bar 717 Ranch/Camp Trinity in Hayfork, CA, said, “Like many other businesses in this area, ours is fueled by people seeking to experience the wild beauty of Trinity County. Our business is recreation, and recreation is a growing industry as California’s population increases and urbanizes. The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act recognizes and promotes the economic opportunities that recreation presents to our rural communities. We need wilderness, clean free-flowing rivers, trails and healthy forests to sustain our business, just as we need economic development in our communities for our employees and their families to thrive. H.R. 2250 recognizes these needs are interlinked and works to support both preservation and the economic development that recreation-based business in the region require.”

The public lands and rivers at the heart of this legislation are the setting for countless world class outdoor recreation pursuits, including steelhead and salmon fishing, river floating and rafting, backcountry hiking and mountain biking, and sightseeing among the primeval redwoods. Such activities help support the regional economy and enhance outdoor recreation opportunities by encouraging new infrastructure and upgrades to roads, trails and camping facilities, and by improving the health of the forest and its resilience to wildfire.

“The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation and Working Forests Act is important to those of us who work and live in Humboldt County, because it will help support our local economy,” said Steve O’Meara, founder and president of Kokatat, whose 180 employees produce paddlesports apparel and gear. “Fifty years ago, I established my business here in Arcata, because of the amazing recreational opportunities available in the region. Further protections of our public lands and rivers will greatly enhance the economic and recreational opportunities for our future generations.” 

According to the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation generates $92 billion in consumer spending and 691,000 direct jobs in California. Residents of the state’s 2nd congressional district spend $1.93 billion annually on outdoor recreation, and 134 outdoor companies are based here.

Cynthia LeDoux-Bloom, PhD, a fisheries biologist at Humboldt State University, said, “The rivers of the northwest corner of California provide some of the best remaining habitat in the state for at-risk fishes, such as salmon and steelhead. Anything we can do to better protect and restore stream habitat, water sources and forests here will support the ongoing efforts to rebuild their populations and the fisheries that depend on them. This legislation has been built with feedback from the scientific community to do that.”

Provisions in the bill would help improve community fire safety by creating a network of roadside shaded fuel breaks in the South Fork Trinity-Mad River Restoration Area, and requiring the US Forest Service and the BLM to work with local residents to create a new coordinated fire management plan for all of the designated wilderness areas in the region. 

The legislation would also help cleanup public lands and waters impacted by trespass marijuana grows by creating a local, state, federal and tribal partnership to coordinate activities and provide resources and expertise.

Additionally, the legislation would establish the Elk Camp Ridge Recreation Trail for off-highway vehicles and mountain bikes, and the Horse Mountain Special Management Area. It would also call for developing a Regional Trails Plan and studying the feasibility of establishing The Bigfoot National Recreation Trail, which would highlight the world-­renowned botanical and biological diversity found in this region.

Representatives Judy Chu and Salud Carbajal, both (CA-D), are original cosponsors of the bill. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) sponsors the bill in the Senate.

Community Members Praise Rep. Huffman/Sen. Harris Bill to Restore and Protect Northwest California Public Lands and Rivers

Measure would support local economies and improve forest health and wildfire resiliency

April 10, 2019–Businesses, community leaders, and conservationists from across the region today applauded the introduction of legislation by Rep. Jared Huffman and Sen. Kamala Harris that would protect and restore some of Northwest California’s most unique lands and waters, improve community safety from fire, and help local communities capitalize on the region’s reputation as an outstanding destination for fishing, hunting, hiking, mountain biking, and other outdoor recreation opportunities.

The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act would conserve approximately 262,000 acres as wilderness, designate 379 miles of new wild and scenic rivers, and create a special restoration area of more than 700,000 acres. The bill was crafted after years of input from business leaders, conservationists, anglers, mountain bikers, fire management professionals, and other stakeholders interested in the enjoyment and well-being of these iconic lands.

Visitors come to this region from around the globe to fish for steelhead and salmon, float the rivers, hike and mountain bike the backcountry trails, and find solitude in primeval redwood groves. The legislation will support the regional economy and enhance outdoor recreation opportunities by
spurring new infrastructure and upgrades to old roads, trails and camping facilities, and by improving forest health and resilience to wildfire.

“As a local business owner, I am glad to see the introduction of the Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act,” said Aaron Ostrom, co-owner of Pacific Outfitters . “My father started our business in 1968 and my brother and I have continued the family tradition of helping people get the gear they need to explore, camp, fish, and hunt across our region. These beautiful places support all of our local businesses, since people come to the area to explore and shop while they are here.”

According to the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation generates $92 billion in consumer spending and 691,000 direct jobs in California. Residents of the state’s 2nd congressional district spend $1.93 billion annually on outdoor recreation, and 134 outdoor companies are based here.

“The Trinity River is one of those special steelhead fisheries where you can have multiple fish days. It’s kind of unique in that way,” said fishing guide Leslie Ajari . “Rivers like this can provide a really good quality of life. We have to think in bigger terms about how to keep watersheds like the Trinity
productive as habitat and as places where fishing helps support local economies. I’m very pleased that Rep. Huffman’s and Sen. Harris’s bill will do this for the Trinity and other important streams in one of the last great steelhead strongholds in North America.”

The legislation would establish the Elk Camp Ridge Recreation Trail for off-highway vehicles and mountain bikes, and the Horse Mountain Special Management Area. It would also call for developing a Regional Trails Plan and studying the feasibility of establishing The Bigfoot National Recreation Trail, which would highlight the world- renowned botanical and biological diversity found in this region.

“I started backpacking in the 1970s after returning from the Vietnam War,” said U.S. Navy veteran Steve Robinson. “Like many veterans, the adjustment back to civilian life was difficult. Backpacking was and still is my therapy. I believe we all need to spend more time in parks and wilderness, but public land is especially important for those of us with PTSD or other forms of trauma. I am very grateful to Rep. Huffman and Sen. Harris for recognizing the importance of public lands for all of us to heal and connect with our wild lands.”

“We are enthusiastic about the expanded mountain biking opportunities that this legislation would create, including trails in Del Norte County and a Trinity Lake Trail,” said Tom Phillips, Chair of the Redwood Coast Mountain Bike Association . “It also would authorize the Horse Mountain Special Management Area and a Regional Trail Study to create and expand even more mountain biking trails in the future.”

The legislation will help cleanup public lands and waters impacted by trespass marijuana grows by creating a local, state, federal and tribal partnership to coordinate activities and provide resources and
expertise.

Pristine public forests are currently experiencing an emerging new threat from the destructive ramifications associated with illegal cultivation of cannabis,” said Mourad Gabriel, Ph.d, Executive Director, Integral Ecology Research Center. “Rep. Huffman’s and Sen. Harris’s continued forward vision is necessary for those invested in this topic to gain a foothold and start to effectively address this misuse of our public lands.”

The measure would also help improve community fire safety by creating a network of roadside shaded fuel breaks in the South Fork Trinity-Mad River Restoration Area, and requiring the US Forest Service and the BLM to work with local residents to create a new coordinated fire management plan for all of the designated wilderness areas in the region.

The Northwest California Wilderness, Recreation, and Working Forests Act was built from the ground up to protect the unique public lands and waters of Northwest California, enhance outdoor recreation opportunities, help safeguard local residents and communities from catastrophic wildfire, restore vital fish and wildlife habitat, and boost the regional tourist and recreation economy.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Public TV series This American Land segment on local efforts to protect Northwest California
https://youtu.be/FClqYjm6bhY?t=89

Also see Northwest California Mountains and Rivers support website: https://mountainsandrivers.org/

The Northwest Mountains and Rivers Campaign is a coalition of conservation organizations, business owners, land owners, biologists, hunters, anglers mountain bikers, and other community members who support congressional efforts to protect special places, restore watersheds and fisheries, support economic development, enhance recreational opportunities, and protect communities.

Olsen Creek Proposed Wild and Scenic River

The South Fork Trinity River is one of the largest undammed river systems in California. The river and its tributaries support important populations of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and old-growth forest dependent wildlife species. The river and tributaries also offer outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities.

The federal coho recovery plan identifies Olsen Creek as a high priority restoration target. This Hayfork Creek tributary may also provide important thermal refugia for coho and other anadromous fish.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity & Six Rivers National Forests
Location: Trinity & Humboldt Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District
Watershed: Trinity River
Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  2.8

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, recreation

Rusch Creek Proposed Wild and Scenic River

The South Fork Trinity River is one of the largest undammed river systems in California. The river and its tributaries support important populations of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and old-growth forest dependent wildlife species. The river and tributaries also offer outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities.

Rusch Creek is an important cold water contributor to Hayfork Creek and may provide a thermal refuge for anadromous fish. The creek supports moderate to high densities of steelhead.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity & Six Rivers National Forests
Location: Trinity & Humboldt Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District
Watershed: Trinity River
Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  3.2

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, recreation

Madden Creek Proposed Wild and Scenic River

The South Fork Trinity River is one of the largest undammed river systems in California. The river and its tributaries support important populations of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and old-growth forest dependent wildlife species. The river and tributaries also offer outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities.

Madden Creek is one of the few lower South Fork tributaries with good water quality due to its relatively undisturbed watershed. Cold water from Madden Creek creates a critical thermal refuge for coho salmon migrating up the South Fork and the lower segment of the creek offers suitable habitat for coho, Chinook, and steelhead.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity & Six Rivers National Forests
Location: Trinity & Humboldt Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District
Watershed: Trinity River
Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  8.4

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, recreation

Grouse Creek Proposed Wild and Scenic River

The South Fork Trinity River is one of the largest undammed river systems in California. The river and its tributaries support important populations of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and old-growth forest dependent wildlife species. The river and tributaries also offer outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities.

Grouse Creek is a high priority watershed for the restoration of coho and other South Fork fish stocks. The creek is also offers potential thermal refugia for fish migrating up the South Fork.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity & Six Rivers National Forests
Location: Trinity & Humboldt Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District
Watershed: Trinity River
Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  11.3

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, recreation

Eltapom Creek Proposed Wild and Scenic River

The South Fork Trinity River is one of the largest undammed river systems in California. The river and its tributaries support important populations of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and old-growth forest dependent wildlife species. The river and tributaries also offer outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities.

A government fisheries report describes Eltapom Creek as the “gem” of the South Fork due to its excellent spawning gravel, holding pools, and dense riparian corridor. A critical thermal refuge, the creek supports endangered coho salmon and high densities of winter steelhead, as well as suitable habitat for spring Chinook salmon.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity & Six Rivers National Forests
Location: Trinity & Humboldt Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District
Watershed: Trinity River
Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  3.4

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, recreation

Lacks Creek

credit – Bob Wick

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers flow through or are located upstream of Redwood National Park. They provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and nationally significant recreation opportunities.

A major tributary of Redwood Creek, Lacks Creek was determined by the BLM to be eligible for Wild & Scenic protection due to its outstanding old growth forests and anadromous fishery values. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. The public lands in the Lacks Creek watershed are managed by the BLM to provide a wide variety of outdoor recreation, including mountain biking, hiking, camping, angling, and hunting. The lower 2.7 miles of Lacks Creek is proposed as a “potential” Wild and Scenic River pending acquisition for public conservation purposes.


Management Agency:  National Park Service ~ Redwood National Park
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Humboldt County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Redwood Creek

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  7.8 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, wildlife, ecological, recreation

Lost Man and Little Lost Man Creeks

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers flow through or are located upstream of Redwood National Park. They provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead and nationally significant recreation opportunities.

Supporting self-sustaining populations of Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead, and coastal cutthroat trout, these streams are important to the recovery and expansion of the anadromous salmonid populations of the Redwood Creek basin. Little Lost Man creek provides high quality refugia for at-risk fish species and Lost Man Creek has high potential to provide refugia. The outstanding and irreplaceable ecological values of these streams are recognized world-wide as part of the Redwood National Park World Heritage Site. The streams provide an excellent opportunity for scientific study of disturbed and undisturbed watersheds.


Management Agency:  National Park Service ~ Redwood National Park
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Humboldt County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Redwood Creek

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  19.6

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, wildlife, ecological, recreation

Black Butte Proposed Wilderness

The Wild and Scenic Black Butte River flows northwest for almost 30 miles from the crest of the northern Coast Range to the Wild and Scenic Middle Fork Eel River downstream.

The proposed wilderness is situated in the river’s V-shaped, rugged canyon, where it hosts resident trout, Chinook salmon, and winter-run steelhead. Downstream, the Middle Fork Eel supports what is presently considered to be the southernmost population of summer-run steelhead on the West Coast and the largest single run of summer steelhead in the state. Rich oak forests, meadows, and abundant ancient pine, fir and cedar forest grace the slopes above the river. The Forest Service notes that the region contains so many pristine archeological sites that it is of “exceptional” cultural importance. The Black Butte has been rated as a class IV+ stream (very difficult) by American Whitewater for those brave enough to kayak it.

The Bauer brothers had this to say in American Whitewater Journal after running the stream in the 1970s: “The Black Butte is an all-time classic! We all agreed that we had never experienced a better combination of fantastic rapids, beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and isolation from humanity. Along the way we saw a bear, otters, golden eagles, deer, and some bunnies…For more than twenty miles along the river corridor there were literally no traces left by mankind. Pure wilderness at its best. I can hardly say enough about the quality of the rapids – mile after mile of exhilarating class III-IV+.” The proposed wilderness also has several historic foot and horse trails that offer almost guaranteed solitude.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service, Mendocino National Forest

Location:
Mendocino County, CA; 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Black Butte River, a tributary of the Middle Fork Eel River

Size:
11,065 acres

Recreational Uses: Fishing, kayaking, hiking, horseback riding, important historical sites

Ecological Values: Ancient conifer and hardwood forests, critically-important salmon and steelhead habitat, meadows dominated by native grasses

Mattole River Estuary

Located in the King Range National Conservation Area, the Mattole Estuary provides important anadromous fish habitat for coho and Chinook salmon and steelhead. Federal officials recently identified the river as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. The estuary also provides habitat for several rare plants. A popular campground and recreation site near the mouth of the Mattole that attracts campers, hikers, hunters, and birders, and provides the northern access point for visitors hiking the Lost Coast Trail. The Mattole River is recommended for protection by the BLM.


Management Agency: Bureau of Land Management ~ King Range National Conservation Area
BLM Arcata Field Office

Location: Humboldt County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Mattole River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles: 1.5 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, wildlife, botanical, scenery, recreation

Virgin Creek & New River

The proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers flow from the magnificent Trinity Alps Wilderness, providing important habitat for salmon and steelhead migrating to and from the Trinity River, as well as outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities and scenery.

From its source in the Trinity Alps Wilderness, Virgin Creek cuts its way through bedrock and flows over numerous waterfalls on its journey to the New River. These streams support one of the largest remaining populations of rare summer steelhead in California and provides excellent opportunities for primitive recreation in the scenic Trinity Alps Wilderness. The New River also offers class III-V whitewater boating opportunities. The streams are recommended for protection by the Forest Service.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity National Forests

Location: Trinity County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Trinity River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles: 15 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, recreation, scenery

East Fork of the North Fork Trinity River

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers flow from the magnificent Trinity Alps Wilderness, providing important habitat for salmon and steelhead migrating to and from the Trinity River, as well as outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities and scenery.

Along with the North Fork Trinity and Canyon Creek, the East Fork North Fork is considered by the California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife to be an important stream for maintaining stocks of genetically pure wild anadromous fish. The stream support summer steelhead, spring chinook salmon, and coho salmon.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity National Forests

Location: Trinity County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Trinity River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles: 17.4 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, recreation, scenery

North Fork Trinity River

The proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers flow from the magnificent Trinity Alps Wilderness, providing important habitat for salmon and steelhead migrating to and from the Trinity River, as well as outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities and scenery.

The North Fork Trinity River rises from the Trinity Alps high country and flows south to the Trinity River. The North Fork provides excellent habitat for coho and Chinook salmon, and steelhead. The North Fork’s spectacular scenery, rugged canyon, and waterfalls attracts hikers, backpackers, anglers, and hunters. The river also offers class IV-V whitewater boating opportunities. The watershed provides habitat for Pacific fisher, marten, wolverine, bald eagle, spotted owl, and Peregrine falcon.

The river is recommended for protection by the Forest Service.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Shasta-Trinity National Forests

Location: Trinity County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Trinity River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles: 27.7 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, recreation, scenery

Fish Creek

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers in the upper Eel River watershed provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead, as well as wildlife dependent on old growth forests. They also provide outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation.

Draining a portion of the proposed English Ridge Wilderness, Fish Creek flows into the Eel Wild and Scenic River and provides important anadromous fish habitat. Forests along the creek support endangered spotted owl. The creek flows through mixed public and private lands, which are protected through an easement held by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.


Management Agency:  Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location:  Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles:  4.2 Miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation

Indian Creek

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers in the upper Eel River watershed provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead, as well as wildlife dependent on old growth forests. They also provide outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation.

Draining a portion of the proposed English Ridge Wilderness, Indian Creek flows into the Eel Wild and Scenic River and provides important anadromous fish habitat. The creek flows through mixed public and private lands, which are protected through an easement held by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.


Management Agency:  Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles:  3.3 Miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation

North Fork Eel River

Federal officials recently identified the North Fork Eel River as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. The river canyon supports diverse habitat for several sensitive, threatened, and endangered species, including Peregrine falcon. Offering class II-V whitewater boating opportunities, the river flows through the North Fork Wilderness – one of the most remote and least visited wild areas in the region. The North Fork is recommended for protection by the Forest Service.

 


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Six Rivers National Forest, Mendocino National Forest
Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Trinity & Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  14.3 Miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation

East Branch of South Fork Eel River

The proposed Wild and Scenic River segments of the South Fork Eel and its tributaries support threatened and endangered populations of salmon and steelhead and rare plants. They also provide outstanding research opportunities of nearly pristine undeveloped watersheds.

The BLM found the East Branch South Fork Eel River and its Red Mountain tributaries to be eligible for Wild and Scenic protection because of their important anadromous fish habitat. Because of its water sources in the sponge-like serpentine soils of Red Mountain, extensive forest shading, swift flowing waters, and deep pools, the East Branch provides suitable conditions for salmon and steelhead even during drought. Federal officials recently identified the river as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. Peregrine falcons nest along the river. The East Branch South Fork is proposed as a “Potential Wild & Scenic River” – to be designated once sufficient lands are acquired by the BLM to make a manageable addition to the system.


Management Agency:  Bureau of Land Management ~ BLM Arcata Field Office

Location: Mendocino County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: South Fork Eel River

Potential Wild & Scenic River Miles: 23.1 miles

Cedar Creek

The proposed Wild and Scenic River segments of the South Fork Eel and its tributaries support threatened and endangered populations of salmon and steelhead and rare plants. They also provide outstanding research opportunities of nearly pristine undeveloped watersheds.

Cedar Creek flows from the serpentine barrens of Red Mountain. The creek was found eligible for Wild and Scenic River protection by the BLM due to its high quality anadromous fish habitat, old growth forests, spotted owl nesting sites, and rare plants found on serpentine soils. Cedar Creek acts as a crucial wildlife corridor between the South Fork Eel and its East Branch.


Management Agency:  Bureau of Land Management ~ BLM Arcata Field Office

Location: Mendocino County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: South Fork Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles: 9.6 miles

Elder Creek

The proposed Wild and Scenic River segments of the South Fork Eel and its tributaries support threatened and endangered populations of salmon and steelhead and rare plants. They also provide outstanding research opportunities of nearly pristine undeveloped watersheds.

This nearly pristine stream is a National Natural Landmark, Hydrologic Benchmark, and a UN-recognized Biosphere Reserve. A tributary of the South Fork Eel River, the creek is an important contributor to the South Fork’s anadromous fishery. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The upper creek segment is in the South Fork Wilderness managed by the BLM. The lower segment flows through UC Berkeley’s Angelo Preserve. The creek would be administered through a cooperative management agreement between the BLM and the State of California.


Management Agency: Bureau of Land Management ~ BLM Arcata Field Office
University of California ~ Angelo Coast Range Reserve

Location:  Mendocino County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: South Fork Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles: 7

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, Biosphere Reserve, hydrological, wildlife, recreation

South Fork Eel River

The proposed Wild and Scenic River segments of the South Fork Eel and its tributaries support threatened and endangered populations of salmon and steelhead and rare plants. They also provide outstanding research opportunities of nearly pristine undeveloped watersheds.

The South Fork Eel River supports the largest concentration of naturally reproducing anadromous fish in the region. Federal officials recently identified the river as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. The upper portion of this segment is located on the Angelo Preserve managed for wild lands research by the University of California. Angelo Reserve access roads are open to public hiking. The lower portion flows through the existing South Fork Wilderness managed by the BLM. The river offers class IV-V whitewater boating opportunities. The river would be administered through a cooperative management agreement between the BLM and the State of California.


Management Agency:  Bureau of Land Management ~ BLM Arcata Field Office
University of California ~ Angelo Coast Range Reserve

Location: Mendocino County, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: South Fork Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles: 12.3 miles

Congressman Huffman Releases Draft Legislation

In early August of 2017, Congressman Jared Huffman released a piece of draft public lands legislation for Northwest California.

Developed in collaboration with a coalition of local businesses, landowners, biologists, conservation organizations, hunters, and anglers, this proposal would protect our wild lands and rivers and expand recreational opportunities while restoring watersheds and managing for fire.

Click Here to learn more about the draft bill

As part of the draft bill release, Congressman Huffman held a series of four town hall meetings across the region to hear from members of local communities.  These meetings were held in Eureka (Humboldt County), Crescent City (Del Norte County), Weaverville (Trinity County) and Ukiah (Mendocino County).

Congressman Huffman is encouraging folks in his congressional district to read more about this legislative proposal here and send any feedback, additions, suggestions, or edits to ca02publiclands@gmail.com.

Red Mountain Creek

Red Mountain Creek flows westward from the Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness to its confluence with the North Fork Eel. The creek supports a healthy anadromous fishery in its lower segment and resident trout upstream. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. Adjacent cliffs also provide habitat for Peregrine falcon. The creek also possesses important contemporary, historic, and prehistoric cultural values. The diverse geology through which the creek flows supports a picturesque mosaic of conifer and oak woodlands.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Six Rivers National Forest, Mendocino National Forest
Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Trinity & Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Proposed Wild & Scenic River Miles:  8.1 miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation

Eden Creek

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers in the upper Eel River watershed provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead, as well as wildlife dependent on old growth forests. They also provide outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation.

Eden Creek flows through an unprotected roadless area to its confluence with Elk Creek. The stream is rich in cultural values. Federal officials identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened Chinook salmon and steelhead. The drainage also provides Peregrine falcon habitat.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Six Rivers National Forest, Mendocino National Forest
Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Trinity & Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles:  2.7 Miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation

Deep Hole Creek

These proposed Wild and Scenic Rivers in the upper Eel River watershed provide important habitat for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead, as well as wildlife dependent on old growth forests. They also provide outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation.

Deep Hole Creek flows through a proposed addition to the Yuki Wilderness. A tributary of Elk Creek, the stream provides suitable spawning and rearing habitat for coho salmon and steelhead. Federal officials identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened Chinook salmon and steelhead. The drainage also provides habitat for the spotted owl.


Management Agency: U.S. Forest Service ~ Six Rivers National Forest, Mendocino National Forest
Bureau of Land Management ~ Arcata Field Office

Location: Trinity & Mendocino Counties, CA 2nd Congressional District

Watershed: Upper Eel River

Wild & Scenic River Miles:  4.3 Miles

Outstanding Values: Anadromous fisheries, ecological, wildlife, cultural, scenery, recreation