Congressman Huffman Releases Draft Legislation & Announces Public Meetings

Congressman Jared Huffman has just released draft public lands legislation for Northwest California.

Developed in collaboration with a coalition of local businesses, landowners, biologists, conservation organizations, hunters, and anglers, this proposal would protect our wild lands and rivers and expand recreational opportunities while restoring watersheds and managing for fire.

Click Here to learn more about the draft bill

Congressman Huffman wants to hear from members of local communities across the region.   Make your voice heard at one of the four town hall meetings he has scheduled to discuss this legislation.

Meetings will be held at the following locations:

Monday, August 14 – Eureka
5:30 – 6:30 pm
The Wharfinger Building,
1 Marina Way, Eureka, CA 95501
Click here to RSVP

Tuesday, August 15 – Crescent City
5:30 – 6:30 pm
Educational Resource Center,
400 West Harding, Crescent City, CA, 95531
Click here to RSVP

Wednesday, August 16 – Weaverville
5:30 – 6:30 pm
Trinity High School,
321 Victory Lane, Weaverville, CA  96093
Click here to RSVP

Tuesday, August 29
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Ukiah Civic Center – Council Chambers
300 Seminary Ave, Ukiah, CA 95482
Click here to RSVP

Congressman Huffman is encouraging folks in his congressional district to read more about this legislative proposal here and send any feedback, additions, suggestions, or edits to ca02publiclands@gmail.com.

Red Mountain Creek

Red Mountain Creek flows westward from the Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness to its confluence with the North Fork Eel. The creek supports a healthy anadromous fishery in its lower segment and resident trout upstream. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. Adjacent cliffs also provide habitat for Peregrine falcon. The creek also possesses important contemporary, historic, and prehistoric cultural values. The diverse geology through which the creek flows supports a picturesque mosaic of conifer and oak woodlands.  8.1 miles are being proposed for Wild & Scenic River designation.

Eden Creek

Eden Creek flows through an unprotected roadless area to its confluence with Elk Creek. The stream is rich in cultural values. Federal officials identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened Chinook salmon and steelhead. The drainage also provides Peregrine falcon habitat.  2.7 miles are being proposed for Wild & Scenic River designation.

Deep Hole Creek

Deep Hole Creek flows through a proposed addition to the Yuki Wilderness. A tributary of Elk Creek, the stream provides suitable spawning and rearing habitat for coho salmon and steelhead. Federal officials identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened Chinook salmon and steelhead. The drainage also provides habitat for the spotted owl.  4.3 miles are being proposed for Wild & Scenic River designation.

Big Creek

Located in the King Range Wilderness, this highly scenic stream is part of a unique coastal backcountry backpacking and camping area along the Lost Coast Trail. The stream also provides spawning and rearing habitat for steelhead and federal officials identified the creek as essential for fish recovery. Big Creek is recommended for protection by the BLM and 4.6 miles are proposed for Wild & Scenic River designation.

Big Flat Creek

Located in the King Range Wilderness, this highly scenic stream is part of a unique coastal backcountry backpacking and camping area along the Lost Coast Trail. The stream also provides spawning and rearing habitat for steelhead and federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened steelhead. Several significant prehistoric sites are located near the stream. Big Flat Creek is recommended for protection by the BLM and 7.5 miles are being proposed for Wild & Scenic designation.

 

Gitchell Creek

Located in the King Range Wilderness, this highly scenic stream is part of a unique coastal backcountry backpacking and camping area along the Lost Coast Trail. The stream also provides spawning and rearing habitat for steelhead. Gitchell Creek is recommended for protection by the BLM.  3 miles of Gitchell Creek are proposed for Wild & Scenic designation.

Bear Creek

Bear Creek and its tributaries drain the eastside of the magnificent King Range. The provides suitable habitat for coho salmon and steelhead, as well as old growth forests for northern spotted owl. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. Significant historic and prehistoric sites are located along the stream and a rare lichen grows there. Campgrounds popular with King Range visitors are located along Bear Creek, which is also the route of the popular Paradise Royale mountain bike trail. Bear Creek is recommended for protection by the BLM.  11 miles of Bear Creek are proposed for Wild & Scenic designation.

Honeydew Creek

Honeydew Creek and its tributaries are in the King Range Wilderness. The creek provides suitable stream habitat for anadromous fish and old growth forest habitat for northern spotted owl. Federal officials recently identified the creek as essential for the recovery of threatened salmon and steelhead. Honeydew Creek is recommended for protection by the BLM.  This proposal designated 10.6 miles.

Chinquapin Proposed Wilderness

Trinity_Chinquapin_PWAThe proposed wilderness contains what is possibly the largest, most intact swath of unprotected ancient forest in northern California.

Extremely rich groves of douglas fir, ponderosa pine, Jeffrey pine, black oak, and incense cedar cover much of the area.

Chinquapin, usually a shrub, grows in an extremely rare tree-form here. Some of these giant chinquapin reach heights of 80 feet or more.

Bald eagle, fisher, marten, Howell’s lewisia (an ornate purple and white flower), Niles’ madia (a yellow-flowered plant with a sage-like smell), pale yellow stonecrop (a succulent), and the tall, slender Umpqua green gentian plant are just a few of the rare or endangered species that call this area home.

According to Forest Service data, Chinquapin is an integral part of the largest and densest populations of northern spotted owls and goshawks in the Trinity side of the two million-acre Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Coho and Chinook salmon and steelhead trout also live in the South Fork Trinity Proposed Wild and Scenic River which bisects the area.

The popular South Fork National Recreation Trail also passes through Chinquapin, following the river and offering excellent swimming, hiking, and horseback riding opportunities.